About MLTC

The Meadow Lake Tribal Council (MLTC) began in 1981 when the First Nations of Northwest Saskatchewan united to form the Meadow Lake District Chiefs Joint Venture. The Meadow Lake District Chiefs became officially known as the Meadow Lake Tribal Council in 1996.

Since that time, the Meadow Lake Tribal Council has become a testament to the cooperative nature of the nine Meadow Lake First Nations (MLFNs) that comprise the tribal council. Under the direction of the MLFNs Chiefs, the Meadow Lake Tribal Council has progressed steadily as a second-level programs and services provider. The dedication of the MLTC managers and staff has proven itself in the efficient and effective assistance it provides to the MLFNs-level programs and services that operate within the nine communities.

As the relationship between the MLFNs and their tribal council develops, both sides work towards improving existing program and service delivery and creating program and services to meet the ever-changing needs of the nine MLFNs. This partnership and team atmosphere has a long running track record of responsive and responsible use of available resources. Over the last 28 years the reciprocal atmosphere of support and progression has seen invaluable contributions made to the overall wellbeing and success of MLFNs initiatives.


The MLTC First Nations

The nine First Nations that currently form MLTC includes:

Birch Narrows Dene Nation; Buffalo River Dene Nation; Canoe Lake Cree Nation; Clearwater River Dene Nation; English River First Nation; Flying Dust First Nation; Makwa Sahgaiehcan First Nation; Ministikwan Lake Cree Nation and Waterhen Lake First Nation.

MLTC works as an advocate for the nine First Nations to reach their full potential by delivering programs and services. The MLTC also works with the nine First Nations participating in the Proposed Governance Agreement.

There are five Cree First Nations and four Dene First Nations within the MLTC. As of November 2010 the total registered membership of all nine MLFNs was 12,618. There are 6,976 members residing on-reserve within the nine First Nations and 5,642 members residing at locations off-reserve as of November 2010. The first languages are Cree and Dene.